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Formula milk marketing: WHO reveals shocking details

Formula milk companies are paying social media platforms and influencers to gain direct access to pregnant women and mothers to drive sales of breast-milk substitutes, thus dissuading mothers from breastfeeding, says WHO.

ByIFP Bureau

Updated 29 Apr 2022, 4:50 pm

(Representational Image: TT_Unsplash)
(Representational Image: TT_Unsplash)

The WHO has called on the baby food industry to end exploitative formula milk marketing, and on governments to protect new children and families by enacting, monitoring and enforcing laws to end all advertising or promotion of formula milk products. It states that formula milk companies are paying social media platforms and influencers to gain direct access to pregnant women and mothers with personalised social media content that is often not recognizable as advertising.

The WHO report titled "Scope and impact of digital marketing strategies for promoting breast-milk substitutes" has outlined the digital marketing techniques designed to influence the decisions new families make on how to feed their babies.

According to a WHO release, through tools like apps, virtual support groups or ‘baby-clubs’, paid social media influencers, promotions and competitions and advice forums or services, formula milk companies can buy or collect personal information and send personalized promotions to new pregnant women and mothers.

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The report summarizes findings of new research that sampled and analyzed four million social media posts about infant feeding published between January and June 2021, using a commercial social listening platform. These posts reached 2.47 billion people and generated more than 12 million likes, shares or comments.

Formula milk companies post content on their social media accounts around 90 times per day, reaching 229 million users; representing three times as many people as are reached by informational posts about breastfeeding from non-commercial accounts. 

This pervasive marketing is increasing purchases of breast-milk substitutes and therefore dissuading mothers from breastfeeding exclusively as recommended by WHO.

The WHO states that exclusive and continued breastfeeding are key determinants of improved lifelong health for children, women and communities.

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“The promotion of commercial milk formulas should have been terminated decades ago,” said Dr Francesco Branca, Director of the WHO Nutrition and Food Safety department. “The fact that formula milk companies are now employing even more powerful and insidious marketing techniques to drive up their sales is inexcusable and must be stopped.”

The report compiled evidence from social listening research on public online communications and individual country reports of research that monitors breast-milk substitute promotions, as well as drawing on a recent multi-country study of mothers’ and health professionals’ experiences of formula milk marketing. The studies show how misleading marketing reinforces myths about breastfeeding and breast milk and undermines women’s confidence in their ability to breastfeed successfully. 

The proliferation of global digital marketing of formula milk blatantly breaches the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes (“the Code”), which was adopted by the 1981 World Health Assembly. The Code is a landmark public health agreement designed to protect the general public and mothers from aggressive marketing practices by the baby food industry that negatively impact breastfeeding practices.

The fact that these forms of digital marketing can evade scrutiny from national monitoring and health authorities means new approaches to Code-implementing regulation and enforcement are required. Currently, national legislation may be evaded by marketing that originates beyond borders, the release stated.

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First published:29 Apr 2022, 12:01 pm

Tags:

whosocial mediapregnant womenmothersformula milk marketingbaby food

IFP Bureau

IFP Bureau

IMPHAL, Manipur

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